Friday

Are elk antlers safe as dog chew toys?



OK, I admit it. My nine-month-old Labrador mix pup is a pretty assertive chewer.  She’s gone through more chew toys than I can count.

That’s why I followed a friend’s recommendation and popped for a medium-sized $9 all-natural elk antler piece for her to chew. The friend pointed out that her own dog had enjoyed a single elk antler for more than six months.

She loved it. In fact, she wouldn’t leave the elk antler chew alone. It kept her busy, happily gnawing away, for longer than any toy she has ever tried.

However, within a day, this is what her all-natural elk antler looked like.

Not exactly a bargain to sink one’s teeth into.

After a day of chewing, my dog’s elk antler piece looks as dangerous as a turkey bone, having broken into multiple extra-sharp pieces. I had to take it away from her and toss it in the trash, for her safety’s sake.

Maybe all-natural elk antlers are safer for older dogs, who are not teething and don’t tend to chew so assertively. Perhaps the bigger elk antlers are worth the extra money, if they don’t break apart so easily. Still, I have to wonder.
But I guess I won’t be dropping any more bucks for elk antlers anytime soon.

Image/s:
Adapted from Elk Antler
product promo photo
  fair use
Additional photo by
LAN for Fad to the Bone

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Wednesday

Is the Nylabone Dental Ring worth sinking teeth into?




Having tossed out far too many chew toys for dogs, I opted to buy a few Nylabone products. These canine dental bones and playthings are known for generally holding up a lot longer than some of the cheaper versions.

This one was an immediate favorite for our puppy.

The white-and-green zig-zag striped and knotted rope ring (constructed of cotton and nylon) includes a hard plastic nubby medallion with mint flavoring. I didn’t know how Little Big Dog (a Lab mix puppy) would react to the mint feature, but she took to it right away.

The nubby texture is supposed to help with the dog’s dental health, by cutting down on tartar buildup on the teeth.

Does the Nylabone Dental Ring offer enough bite for the buck?

Here’s what ours looks like, after a week of use by Little Big Dog, who is given to enthusiastic gnawing and playing. At this point in her life, she gives chew toys a real workout.

Compared to the Nylabone Dental Rope, the ring seems considerably stronger and more durable. Little Big Dog went through the rope in a couple of days. Although the rope ring shows some signs of wear, it is holding up fairly well.

The Nylabone Dental Ring retails for close to $15, but I picked it up on sale for $5.99.That made it a pretty good deal.

Image/s:
Nylabone Dental Ring
product promo photo
  fair use
Additional photo by
LAN for Fad to the Bone

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter.  You are invited to subscribe for free to my General Pets Examiner column, so you will receive email notifications whenever new articles appear.